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Independent clause

An independent clause (or main clause) is a clause that can stand by itself as a simple sentence. An independent clause contains a subject and a predicate and makes sense with another word(s).

Independent clauses can be joined by using a semicolon or by using a comma followed by a coordinating conjunction (and, but, for, or, nor, so, yet)

Examples

In the following example sentence, independent clauses are in italic, and conjunctions are in bold. Single independent clauses:

  • I have enough money to buy an ice cream cone.
  • My favourite flavour is chocolate.

Multiple independent clauses:

  • I have enough money to buy an ice cream cone; my favourite flavour is chocolate.
  • I have enough money to buy an ice cream cone, so let's go to the shop.
License: CC BY-SA 3.0. Source: wikipedia (1, 2)

See also

Relative clause

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